Dulwich College hires immigration lawyer to help caretaker who needs bone marrow transplant from brother

News Desk (09 June, 2016)

Isaac is appealing to the Home Office and others to allow his brother to come to the UK and his employer, Dulwich College, has arranged for an immigration lawyer to assist.

9892Isaac Aganozor

Dulwich College has hired an immigration lawyer to help with a sick caretaker’s plea to have his Nigerian brother granted a visa so he can give a lifesaving bone marrow transplant in the UK.

Isaac Aganozor, 44, of Sydenham Hill, suffers from leukaemia and was told by Bart’s Hospital, Smithfield that his brother, Patrick, is a match for a vital bone marrow transplant.

Patrick’s visa was denied, however, on economic grounds as the Home Office felt they were not convinced he would leave the UK once the transplant was over.

Isaac is now appealing to the Home Office and others to allow his brother to come to the UK and his employer, Dulwich College, has arranged for an immigration lawyer to assist.

Simon Yiends, Chief Operating Officer at Dulwich College, said: “We’ve paid for an immigration solicitor to make sure all the ‘i’s get dotted and that everything goes smoothly.

“The College’s position is that this is a sick man and he needs help. Bart’s have told us that it is essential that his brother gets here for a fairly non-invasive procedure in the next four to five weeks.

“The College has paid for his return ticket and accommodation for the time that he’s here so it’s really all ready to go.”

Isaac has urged the Home Office to consider his “right to life” instead of his brother’s “economic situation” as his health deteriorates.

He said: “It makes me feel sad because Patrick coming here would have been the closest thing I could have to a cure. From the beginning I was told this leukaemia is very high risk.

“For the immigration office to think that Patrick won’t go back to Nigeria is not fair. They have no proof of this. Patrick has a little daughter and is a major carer for our sick mother.

“Patrick being a match is the happiest news I have had but my hope was dashed when he was refused. When the refusal happened I lost that hope. It is making me afraid.

“I think the immigration office and Home Office should have considered my right to life instead of Patrick’s economic position.

“I am deeply sad. If I don’t have it I will just pass away. The solution to this is no more than six hours’ plane journey away. I don’t know what to do. I am really afraid. I am willing to sign anything that gives a guarantee that Patrick will go home afterwards. I will be willing to be prosecuted if he doesn’t.”

A Home Office statement said all cases are considered on their individual merits and that the “onus is on the individual to provide the necessary supporting evidence to meet UK immigration rules”.

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