Troubles exhibition displayed in Elephant and Castle

Katherine Johnston (11 March, 2020)

'This project is an opportunity to remind ourselves what is at stake, and the devastating impact that a revival of sectarianism can have'

35351British soldiers drag ringleaders from a rock-throwing group and beat them severely. 1971. (c) Ian Berry

A photography exhibition looking back at the troubles in Northern Ireland and the continuing legacy of the conflict is on display at the London College of Communication in Elephant and Castle this month.

Territorial Troubles: Contested Realities in Northern Ireland, features images and videos including interviews with men and women detained in Armagh Gaol, the Maze, and Long Kesh.

The exhibition, launching on March 17, also includes an image of journalist Lyra McKee’s funeral held last year.  McKee was shot in April 2019 in Derry, during a riot, allegedly by a New IRA dissident republican. At the time of her death, McKee had been researching unsolved killings during the troubles.

Co-curator Brigitte Lardinois, London College of Communication’s photography and research centre director, said: “We hope this exhibition will inform visitors as to the reality of life during the troubles, while serving as a timely reminder of just how recent, and significant, the cessation of hostilities was.

“Britain’s decision to leave the European Union has enormous consequences for both Northern Ireland and the Republic, particularly regarding the peace process. The murder of Belfast journalist Lyra McKee last year shows the fragility of this peace.

“This project is an opportunity to remind ourselves what is at stake, and the devastating impact that a revival of sectarianism can have.”

The 21 photographs are taken from the new edition of Magnum Ireland, a photobook first published in 2005 and now reprinted with a new chapter focusing on the 2010s.  Alongside the images are essays from writers including John Banville, Colm Tóibín, and Anne Enright.

Territorial Troubles: Contested Realities in Northern Ireland is open to the public from March 18 to June 19 on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 11am-4pm.

Click on the image below to launch the gallery.

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